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Friday, April 5th, 2013

Cape Farewell, an innovative program designed to raise awareness of climate change, is the brainchild of British artist David Buckland. He has led five highly successful expeditions to the high Arctic, including four for artists and scientists and the inaugural youth expedition in September 2007.

A stunning book entitled Burning Ice: Art & Climate Change, celebrating the research and artwork that has evolved from the Cape Farewell voyages, was published in 2007.

Sheila Watt-Clouthier, a Nobel Peace Prize nominee, calls the Arctic “the health barometer for the planet”. The Arctic is where the impacts of climate change are most dramatic and most dire for the people who live there – but the impacts of these changes are felt worldwide. That is why Cape Farewell is organizing two expeditions to Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic in 2008. One is an artists’ and scientists’ expedition and the other is a youth expedition.

The objective of the Cape Farewell project is to raise the awareness of climate change and its implications. The warming of the planet poses an urgent challenge to humankind and this challenge is more than a challenge to the environment. It is also a threat to energy security, prosperity and development.

The economic costs of taking action now are much less than the costs to future generations if we fail to act, according to the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change (2006).

Canadian high schools chosen for international climate change expedition

Friday, April 5th, 2013

Ottawa (March 3, 2008) — British Council Canada announced today 15 schools will represent Canada in an international climate change awareness program known as Cape Farewell. The schools, representing each province and territory, were selected in a national competition.
Cape Farewell is an innovative arts and science education program designed to raise awareness of climate change and to give young people a voice in their own future.

The focal point of the project is the Cape Farewell Youth Expedition 2008 that will bring together high school students from across Canada with top scientists, artists and educators. The voyage is the “tip of the iceberg” because those young communicators, aged 15 to 17, will represent teams of students from their schools and communities.

Schools selected for this year’s voyage (with contacts in brackets):

Holy Trinity High School, Torbay, NL (Dianne Neil 709-437-5563).
Canso Academy, NS (Paul Landry 902-366-2420).
Charlottetown Rural High School, Charlottetown, PE (Dylan Mullaly 902-368-6905).
Rothesay High School, Rothesay, NB (Roger Brown 506-847-6204).
Philemon Wright High School, Gatineau, PQ (Matt McKechnie 819-776-3158).
Timiskaming District Secondary School, New Liskeard, ON (Douglas Fraser 705-647-7336).
Southwood Secondary School, Cambridge, ON (Christopher Geisler 519-621-5920 X 180).
R.D. Parker Collegiate, Thompson, MB (Rob Fisher 204-677-6200).
Invermay School, Invermay, SA (Gail Krawetz 306-593-2233).
St. Mary’s High School, Calgary, AB (Bonnie-Jean Marconi 403-228-5810).
Belmont Secondary School, Victoria, BC (Donald Grant 250-478-5501).
Carson Graham Secondary School, North Vancouver, BC (Lisa Richardson 604-903-3552).
Tusarvik School, Repulse Bay, NU (Jeremy Chippett 867-462-9920).
Chief Jimmy Bruneau Regional High School, Bechoko, NT (Myles Griffin 867-371-4511).
Porter Creek Secondary School, Whitehorse, YT (Gordon Puddister 867-667-8044).
The expedition is designed to engage a whole generation of young Canadians and Canadian schools. The voyage across Arctic seas, with students from Britain, Brazil, Mexico, Germany and Ireland, will equip these young Canadians as Climate Change Ambassadors at home and abroad.

“We were thrilled by the exceptionally high standards of the applications we received from the schools,” says Martin Rose, director of the British Council Canada. “They were deeply thoughtful and wonderfully imaginative, involving students, school communities and their regions.”

The project focuses on the Arctic because climate change affects the world unevenly and polar regions have been more dramatically and profoundly affected than most others.

Proposals were received from large inner city schools, tiny prairie schools, coastal villages and remote Arctic communities. The schools selected by the British Council and Cape Farewell have hugely different facilities but all share a concern about the impact of climate change on their communities and the world at large.

“The Cape Farewell project has already changed the way climate change is taught in the classroom,” says Rebecca Zalatan, Climate Change Programme Manager for the British Council Canada. “My hope is that the schools involved in this experience will make climate change teaching part of their core curriculum.’’

Teachers and administrative representatives from these schools (as well as schools in Brazil and Mexico) gathered in Montreal in February for a workshop to plan for the upcoming expedition and school initiatives.

Science projects will be developed in areas such as climatology, oceanography, biodiversity and biogeography. Art projects will be developed in genres such as film and photography, fine arts, performing arts and literature.

The British Council is the United Kingdom’s international organization to promote education and cultural relations. It operates at arms length from the British government.

Cape Farewell brings artists, scientists and educators together to bring about long-term change in cultural attitudes towards climate change. Created by British artist David Buckland in 2001, the British-based charity has led five expeditions to the High Arctic.

rare Charitable Research Reserve has sponsored Southwood Secondary School of Cambridge, ON, and Carson Graham Secondary School of Vancouver, BC. Founded in 2001, rare is a stunning 370-hectare (913-acre) nature reserve located at the meeting of the Grand and Speed Rivers – right in the middle of one of the fastest-growing areas in Southern Ontario. A registered charity created to sustain the land in perpetuity, rare conveys the message that everyone has a role to play in serving and nurturing our environment if we wish a future living in harmony with nature.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Margret Brady Nankivell
Climate Change Communications Officer
British Council
80 Elgin Street
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5K7, Canada
tel: 1(613)364-6237
cell: 1(613)301-5922
fax: 1(613)569-1478
email: margret.brady@britishcouncil.org

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Des écoles canadiens du secondaire choisis pour participer à une expédition internationale sur les changements climatiques

Ottawa (le 3 mars 2008) – British Council Canada a annoncé aujourd’hui que quinze écoles représenteront le Canada dans le cadre du programme international de sensibilisation aux changements climatiques Cape Farewell. Des écoles de chaque province et territoire ont été sélectionnées par la voie d’un concours nationale. Cape Farewell est un programme éducatif innovateur en arts et en sciences conçu pour sensibiliser le public aux changements climatiques et donner la chance aux jeunes de s’exprimer sur leur avenir.

L’élément central du projet est l’Expédition jeunesse Cape Farewell 2008 qui réunira des élèves du secondaire de toutes les régions du Canada et des scientifiques, artistes et éducateurs de premier plan. L’expédition ne constitue toutefois que la pointe de l’« iceberg » puisque ces jeunes communicateurs âgés de 15 à 17 ans représenteront des équipes d’élèves de leurs écoles et communautés.

Les écoles sélectionnées pour l’expédition de cette année sont :

Holy Trinity High School, Torbay, NL (Dianne Neil 709-437-5563).
Canso Academy, NS (Paul Landry 902-366-2420).
Charlottetown Rural High School, Charlottetown, PE (Dylan Mullaly 902-368-6905).
Rothesay High School, Rothesay, NB (Roger Brown 506-847-6204).
Philemon Wright High School, Gatineau, PQ (Matt McKechnie 819-776-3158).
Timiskaming District Secondary School, New Liskeard, ON (Douglas Fraser 705-647-7336).
Southwood Secondary School, Cambridge, ON (Christopher Geisler 519-621-5920 X 180).
R.D. Parker Collegiate, Thompson, MB (Rob Fisher 204-677-6200).
Invermay School, Invermay, SA (Gail Krawetz 306-593-2233).
St. Mary’s High School, Calgary, AB (Bonnie-Jean Marconi 403-228-5810).
Belmont Secondary School, Victoria, BC (Donald Grant 250-478-5501).
Carson Graham Secondary School, North Vancouver, BC (Lisa Richardson 604-903-3552).
Tusarvik School, Repulse Bay, NU (Jeremy Chippett 867-462-9920).
Chief Jimmy Bruneau Regional High School, Bechoko, NT (Myles Griffin 867-371-4511).
Porter Creek Secondary School, Whitehorse, YT (Gordon Puddister 867-667-8044).
L’expédition vise à susciter la participation de toute une génération de jeunes Canadiens et d’écoles canadiennes. Au terme de cette traversée de l’Arctique avec des élèves de Grande-Bretagne, du Brésil, du Mexique, de l’Allemagne et de l’Irlande, ces jeunes Canadiens seront outillés pour devenir des ambassadeurs des changements climatiques chez eux et à l’étranger.

« Nous sommes ravis de la qualité exceptionnelle des candidatures présentées par les écoles, affirme Martin Rose, directeur de British Council Canada. À la fois réfléchies et extrêmement imaginatives, elles font appel à la collaboration des élèves, des communautés scolaires et de leurs régions. »

Si le projet se concentre sur l’Arctique, c’est parce que les changements climatiques n’affectent pas toutes les parties du monde de la même manière et que les régions polaires sont plus profondément touchées par les
changements climatiques que le reste de la planète.

Les organisateurs du programme ont reçu des propositions de vastes écoles en milieu urbain, de petites écoles des Prairies, de villages côtiers et de communautés éloignées de l’Arctique. Les écoles sélectionnées par le British Council et Cape Farewell disposent d’infrastructures très différentes, mais elles partagent la même préoccupation à l’égard des changements climatiques au sein de leurs communautés et à l’échelle de la planète.

« Déjà, le projet Cape Farewell a changé la façon dont on enseigne les changements climatiques en classe, affirme Rebecca Zalatan, gestionnaire du programme des changements climatiques de British Council Canada. « J’espère que les écoles participantes intégreront l’éducation sur les changements climatiques à leur programme d’étude. »

En février dernier, des enseignants et des membres de la direction de ces écoles (et d’établissements du Brésil et du Mexique) ont participé à un atelier à Montréal pour planifier la prochaine expédition et les initiatives scolaires.

Divers projets scientifiques dans des domaines comme la climatologie, l’océanographie, la biodiversité et la biogéographie seront mis sur pied. Les participants élaboreront aussi des projets artistiques dans les disciplines du cinéma et de la photographie, des beaux-arts, des arts de la scène et de la littérature.

Le British Council est l’organisme international du Royaume-Uni voué aux perspectives éducatives et aux relations culturelles. Il travaille en étroite collaboration avec le gouvernement britannique.

Cape Farewell regroupe des artistes, des scientifiques et des éducateurs afin de changer en profondeur les attitudes culturelles envers les changements climatiques. Créé en 2001 par l’artiste britannique David Buckland, l’organisme caritatif britannique a à ce jour organisé cinq expéditions dans l’Extrême-Arctique.

La réserve de recherche caritative rare a parrainé la Southwood Secondary School de Cambridge, en Ontario, et la Carson Graham Secondary School de Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique. Fondée en 2001, rare est une splendide réserve naturelle de 370 hectares (913 acres) située au confluent des rivières Grand et Speed. Reconnu d’utilité publique, l’organisme caritatif rare, qui s’est donné pour mission la protection de la terre à perpétuité, soutient que chacun a un rôle à jouer dans la préservation et le développement durable de l’environnement si l’on veut continuer à vivre en harmonie avec la nature.

RENSEIGNEMENTS :

Margret Brady Nankivell
Agente de communications des changements climatiques
British Council
tél. : 1-613-364-6237 ou cell. : 1-613-301-5922
courriel : margret.brady@britishcouncil.org
www.capefarewellcanada.ca

Canadian High School Students picked to participate in British Council International Climate Champion program

Friday, April 5th, 2013

British Council Canada has selected three Canadian high school students to go to the G8 Environment Ministers’ Conference in Kobe, Japan, in late May. The Canadian International Climate Champions are from schools in Stouffville and Oakville, Ontario, and Montreal, Quebec. They will be part of a group of 39 outstanding students from around the world that will make a presentation to the Environment Ministers of the G8 countries during their meeting that runs from May 24 to 26. Climate change will be a key item on the ministers’ agenda.

The International Climate Champions will meet each other in London, England, from March 24 to March 30, to meet experts in climate change and to discuss the Kobe Challenge that they will present to the environment ministers.
The students were selected because of their passion about environmental issues and their communication skills. The competition was run by 2 Degrees C Inc. of Guelph, Ontario, and the finalists were assessed by the British Council.

Seven other high school students were picked as National Climate Champions. They are from Vancouver and Powell River, British Columbia, Edmonton, Alberta, Warren, Manitoba, Burlington and Toronto in Ontario, and Montreal, Quebec, They will go the Canadian Science Writers’ Association’s annual Conference in Whitehorse, Yukon, that runs from May 24 to May 27. The conference theme is “Science Under the Midnight Sun” which addresses science in a changing climate.

International Climate Champions:

Meagan M., Abbey Park High School, Oakville, ON
Caroline J., The Study, Montreal, Quebec
Katie S., Stouffville District Secondary School, Stouffville, Ontario
National Climate Champions:

Forrest B., Carson Graham Secondary School, North Vancouver, BC
Graham M., Brooks Secondary School, Powell River, BC
Julie D., The Study, QC
Bali S., Archbishop MacDonald High School, Edmonton, Alberta
Luisa L., University of Toronto Schools, Toronto, Ontario
Meredith D., Nelson High School, Burlington, Ontario
Jacqueline P., Warren Collegiate Institute, Warren, Manitoba.
“We are impressed by the passion and versatility of the young Canadians who were selected for this programme,” says Rebecca Zalatan, Climate Change Programme Manager of the British Council Canada. “They are bound to make their mark at the G8 Environment Ministers’ Meeting and at the Canadian Science Writers’ Conference.”

The British Council is the United Kingdom’s international organization to promote education and cultural relations. It operates at arms length from the British government.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Margret Brady Nankivell
Climate Change Communications Officer
British Council
80 Elgin Street
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5K7, Canada
tel: 1(613)364-6237
cell: 1(613)301-5922
fax: 1(613)569-1478
margret.brady@britishcouncil.org

Rebecca Zalatan
Climate Change Programme Manager
Tel: 1(613)364-6140
Cell: 1(613)302-0880
rebecca.zalatan@britishcouncil.org
www.capefarewellcanada.ca

Backgrounder:

International Climate Champions:

Meagan M.
As the president of Abbey Park High School’s Environmental Council in Oakville, Ontario, Meagan M. is an active youth leader devoted to raising awareness on environmental issues. In grade 11, she is the founder of her school’s Eco Schools program which won the Silver Eco Schools Award. She has spearheaded several environmental initiatives including a “greening project” that plants over 250 trees in Oakville every fall and spring. Meagan is a Student Representative for the Halton District School Board’s Environmental Management Team. She was also a speaker at the Board’s Eco Schools Conference where she debated the use of cosmetic pesticides. Her participation allowed for a bylaw to be enacted several months later.

Caroline J.
Caroline J. is a grade 11 student who attends The Study in Montreal, Quebec. This year, she was one of the top speakers at the Provincial debating tournament and was selected to participate in the North American Debating Championships. In 2007, Caroline received awards for Outstanding Personal Character and Intellectual Promise from the Yale Club of Montreal as well as the school’s Journalism Prize. She has won several awards for writing, math, and science (including the McGill Chemistry award), and is a competitor in this year’s Shalheveth Freier Physics Tournament. In addition to this, Caroline has completed over 300 hours of community service and participated in the Montreal Millennium Summit (2007) and the Youth Empowered Conference (2008). She has a red belt in Tae Kwon Do and is a marathon runner.

Katie S.
From Stouffville District Secondary School, in Stouffville, Ontario, Katie S. is a grade 11 student who is passionate about educating and informing others about climate change issues. She has been involved in a number of environmental initiatives in her school and is currently enrolled in Leadership Enrichment and Development (LEAD), a school program aimed at cultivating strong leadership skills through opportunities to help the local community. In 2006, she was selected to attend the Youth Leadership Summit in Salt Lake City, where she learned how to put plans for change into action.

National Climate Champions:

Forest B.
Forest B. is a grade 10 student at Carson Graham Secondary School in North Vancouver, British Columbia. His involvement with the Carson Graham’s Roots & Shoots Club has facilitated several education initiatives aimed at raising awareness and promoting action on climate change issues. Such programs include continued highway cleanups through the Adopt-A-Highway Program, environmental awareness days, and the Mahon Stewardship Program. Forest has also attended many conferences on climate change such as Youth EmPowered. His dedication to the environment at the local level demonstrates that he is committed to ensuring sustainability.

Graham M.
Grade 10 student Graham M. from Brooks Secondary School in Powell River, British Columbia, is an active member of Students for Environmental Awareness (SEA). He played a key role in the formation of SEA whose activities include beach cleanups, educating elementary school children on the environment, and attending city council meetings. He has also had the opportunity to be a youth representative at a press conference for the creation of a sustainability charter in his local community. He is a grass roots activist who recently organized a 160-km charity bike ride which raised more than $2,000 for malaria prevention.

Julie D.
In grade 11, at The Study in Montreal, Quebec, Julie D. has won several academic awards including the 2007 Regional Science Fair Gold Medal and a certificate of excellence in the History of Quebec and Canada for attaining 100% on the 2007 provincial exam. This year, she is a competitor in the Shalheveth Freier Physics Tournament and has participated in her school’s film festival for the last two years. In addition, she attended several conferences including the Youth Summit on Climate Change (2007), Montreal Millennium Summit (2007), and the Youth Empowered Conference (2008). She is a pianist and has studied the violin and clarinet.

Bali S.
Bali S. from Archbishop MacDonald High School in Edmonton, Alberta, is a grade 11 student who is currently writing a book on her experiences in the Arctic and its changing climate. She won a $5,000 grant from Students on Ice, an organization that facilitated her to visit Nunavut and observe climate change first hand. Her dedication to environmental education is evident in her experience developing and presenting lectures to schools and non-profit organizations on climate change impacts on the Arctic, Inuit people, and wildlife in Edmonton. She is working on a project to protect bowhead whales in Isabella Bay from potential development of the Northwest Passage.

Luisa L.
In grade 10, Luisa L. attends the University of Toronto Schools in Toronto. She is an active member of her community and has put into action a Green Bin program in her school with the help of her peers. In this program, she was responsible for recruiting, training, and organizing over 80 volunteers. Her leadership and strong communication skills allow Luisa to be an advocate for community partnerships to encourage action on climate change issues locally. She is also a member of her school’s student council and in April, will be attending the Model United Nations for students across southern Ontario.

Meredith D.
From Nelson High School in Burlington, Ontario, Meredith D. is a grade 10 student who enjoys participating in discussions and debates on environmental issues including competing in various public speaking competitions. She is an active member of her school’s biology club that preaches environmental diversity and is a member of the Student Activity Council. In addition, Meredith is scheduled to attend the Southern Ontario Model United Nations Assembly where she will represent the tiny Pacific island nation Tuvalu and be on the Historical Crisis Committee for the Korean War.

Jacqueline P.
Jacqueline P. is a grade 11 student from Warren Collegiate Institute in Warren, Manitoba. In January 2007, she was nominated by her school to participate in the Global Youth Leadership Program in Washington DC and New York City. Here she discussed, debated, and presented global issues at the United Nations Youth Summit representing Japan. She was also nominated to take part in the global summit being held this June in Beijing, China. Jacqueline is passionate about educating and engaging local schools and community groups to work together on issues of climate change.

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Des élèves canadiens du secondaire choisis pour participer au programme Champions internationaux du climat du British Council

British Council Canada a sélectionné trois élèves canadiens du secondaire pour participer à la Réunion des ministres de l’environnement du G8 à Kobe, au Japon, à la fin mai. Les Champions internationaux du climat canadiens fréquentent des écoles de Stouffville et d’Oakville, en Ontario, et de Montréal, au Québec. Ils feront partie d’un groupe de 39 élèves exceptionnels, provenant des quatre coins du globe, qui feront une présentation devant les ministres de l’Environnement des pays du G8 dans le cadre de la réunion qui se tiendra du 24 au 26 mai. Les changements climatiques seront un point clé à l’ordre du jour des ministres.

Les Champions du climat internationaux se réuniront à Londres, en Angleterre, du 24 au 30 mars, pour rencontrer des experts des changements climatiques et discuter du Défi Kobe qu’ils présenteront aux ministres de l’Environnement.

Les élèves ont été sélectionnés en raison de leur passion à l’égard des questions environnementales et de leurs aptitudes à communiquer. Le concours a été organisé par 2degreesC Inc. de Guelph, en Ontario, et les finalistes ont été évalués par le British Council.

Sept autres élèves du secondaire ont été désignés Champions nationaux du climat. Ils viennent de Vancouver et de Powell River, en Colombie-Britannique, d’Edmonton, en Alberta, de Warren, au Manitoba, de Burlington et de Toronto, en Ontario, et de Montréal, au Québec. Ces jeunes participeront à la réunion annuelle de l’Association canadienne des rédacteurs scientifiques qui aura lieu à Whitehorse, au Yukon, du 24 au 27 mai. Sous le thème « Science Under the Midnight Sun » (« La science sous le soleil de minuit »), la rencontre portera sur la science dans un climat en changement.

International Climate Champions:

Meagan M., Abbey Park High School, Oakville, ON
Caroline J., The Study, Montreal, Quebec
Katie S., Stouffville District Secondary School, Stouffville, Ontario
National Climate Champions:

Forrest B., Carson Graham Secondary School, North Vancouver, BC
Graham M., Brooks Secondary School, Powell River, BC
Julie D., The Study, QC
Bali S., Archbishop MacDonald High School, Edmonton, Alberta
Luisa L., University of Toronto Schools, Toronto, Ontario
Meredith D., Nelson High School, Burlington, Ontario
Jacqueline P., Warren Collegiate Institute, Warren, Manitoba.
« Nous sommes impressionnés par l’engagement et la polyvalence des jeunes Canadiens qui ont été choisis pour ce programme, déclare Rebecca Zalatan, gestionnaire du programme des changements climatiques de British Council Canada. Ils feront certainement leurs marques à la Réunion des ministres de l’Environnement du G8 et à la rencontre de l’Association canadienne des rédacteurs scientifiques. »

Le British Council est l’organisme international du Royaume-Uni voué aux perspectives éducatives et aux relations culturelles. Il travaille en étroite collaboration avec le gouvernement britannique.

Margret Brady Nankivell
Agente des communications – changements climatiques
British Council
80, rue Elgin
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5K7, Canada
tél. : 1-613-364-6237
cell. : 1-613-301-5922
fax : 1-613-569-1478
margret.brady@britishcouncil.org

Rebecca Zalatan
Gestionnaire du programme des changements climatiques
tél. : 1-613-364-6140
cell. : 1-613-302-0880
rebecca.zalatan@britishcouncil.org
www.capefarewellcanada.ca

RENSEIGNEMENTS :

Champions internationaux du climat

Meagan M.
À titre de présidente du conseil environnemental de la Abbey Park High School à Oakville, en Ontario, Meagan M. est une jeune leader qui travaille activement à sensibiliser l’opinion aux questions environnementales. Cette élève de 11e année a mis sur pied le programme Eco Schools de son école, qui a remporté le prix Silver Eco Schools Award. Elle a été le fer de lance de plusieurs initiatives environnementales dont un « projet d’écologisation » qui consiste à planter plus de 250 arbres dans Oakville chaque automne et chaque printemps. Meagan est la représentant étudiante de l’équipe de gestion environnementale du Conseil scolaire du district de Halton. Elle a aussi pris la parole à la Eco Schools Conference du Conseil pour débattre de l’utilisation de pesticides cosmétiques. Sa participation a donné lieu à l’adoption d’un règlement quelques mois plus tard.

Caroline J.
Caroline J. est une élève de 11e année qui fréquente l’école The Study à Montréal, au Québec. Cette année, elle s’est classée parmi les meilleurs aux championnats de débats provinciaux et elle a été choisie pour participer aux championnats de débats nord-américains. En 2007, Caroline a été récompensée par le Yale Club de Montréal pour sa personnalité exceptionnelle et son haut potentiel intellectuel et elle a également mérité le prix de journalisme de son école. Elle a remporté plusieurs distinctions en rédaction, en mathématiques et en sciences (dont le prix de chimie de McGill) et elle prendra part cette année au tournoi de physique Shalheveth Freier. En outre, Caroline a donné plus de 300 heures de services à la collectivité et elle a participé au Sommet du millénaire de Montréal (2007) et à la Youth Empowered Conference (2008). Marathonienne, elle est aussi ceinture rouge en taekwondo.

Katie S.
Élève de 11e année à la Stouffville District Secondary School, à Stouffville, en Ontario, Katie S. a à cœur d’éduquer et de renseigner les autres sur les changements climatiques. Elle a pris part à diverses initiatives environnementales à son école et elle est actuellement inscrite au programme scolaire Leadership Enrichment and Development (LEAD), qui vise à développer de solides habiletés de leadership par des activités de soutien à la communauté locale. En 2006, elle a été sélectionnée pour participer au Youth Leadership Summit à Salt Lake City, où elle a appris comment mettre en œuvre des projets de changement.

Champions nationaux du climat

Forest B.
Forest B. est en 10e année à la Carson Graham Secondary School à North Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique. Son engagement au sein du Carson Graham’s Roots & Shoots Club a contribué à la réalisation de plusieurs initiatives éducatives destinées à alerter l’opinion et à promouvoir l’action pour lutter contre les changements climatiques. Parmi ces activités figurent des nettoyages réguliers des bordures d’autoroute dans le cadre du Programme Adoptez une route, des journées de sensibilisation à l’environnement ainsi que le Projet d’intendance du parc Mahon. Forest a aussi participé à de nombreuses rencontres sur les changements climatiques telles que Youth Empowered. Son ardeur à défendre l’environnement à l’échelle locale témoigne de sa détermination à assurer un développement durable.

Graham M.
Élève de 10e année à la Brooks Secondary School à Powell River, en Colombie-Britannique, Graham M. est un membre actif de l’association Students for Environmental Awareness (SEA). Il a joué un rôle clé dans la création de SEA dont les activités englobent le nettoyage des berges, l’é ducation sur l’environnement auprès des élèves du primaire et la participation aux assemblées du conseil municipal. À titre de représentant des jeunes, il a aussi eu la chance de prendre part à une conférence de presse pour la création d’une charte du développement durable dans sa communauté. Activiste à l’échelle locale, il a récemment organisé un cyclothon de 160 km qui a recueilli plus de 2 000 $ pour la prévention du paludisme.

Julie D.
En 11e année à The Study à Montréal, au Québec, Julie D. a remporté plusieurs prix d’études dont une médaille d’or à l’Expo-sciences régionale 2007 et un certificat d’excellence en histoire du Québec et du Canada pour avoir obtenu 100 % à l’examen provincial de 2007. Cette année, elle est au nombre des concurrents du tournoi de physique Shalheveth Freier et elle a participé au festival de cinéma de son école au cours des deux dernières années. De plus, elle a pris part à plusieurs conférences dont la Conférence de la jeunesse sur le changement climatique (2007), le Sommet du millénaire de Montréal (2007) et la Youth Empowered Conference (2008). Elle est pianiste et a étudié le violon et la clarinette.

Bali S.
Bali S. de la Archbishop MacDonald High School à Edmonton, en Alberta, est une élève de 11e année qui écrit actuellement un livre sur ses expériences dans l’Arctique et sur la transformation du climat dans cette région. Elle a reçu une bourse de 5 000 $ de l’organisme Students on Ice, qui lui a permis de visiter le Nunavut et d’observer les changements climatiques sur place. Son intérêt pour l’éducation environnementale est manifeste dans sa démarche qui consiste à élaborer et à présenter des exposés sur les répercussions des changements climatiques sur l’Arctique, les Inuits et la faune pour des écoles et organismes sans but lucratif d’Edmonton. Elle travaille à un projet visant à protéger les baleines boréales de la baie Isabella d’un développement éventuel du Passage du Nord-Ouest.

Luisa L.
Élève de 10e année, Luisa L. fréquente l’école University of Toronto Schools à Toronto. Membre active de sa communauté, elle a mis en œuvre un programme de bac vert dans son école avec l’aide de ses camarades. Dans le cadre de ce programme, elle était responsable du recrutement, de la formation et de la coordination de plus de 80 bénévoles. Son leadership et ses excellentes aptitudes à communiquer ont permis à Luisa de promouvoir les partenariats communautaires pour encourager les actions locales en matière de changements climatiques. Elle est aussi membre du conseil étudiant de son école et, en avril, elle participera à la Simulation des Nations Unies à l’intention des élèves du sud de l’Ontario.

Meredith D.
Meredith D. est une élève de 10e année de la Nelson High School à Burlington, en Ontario, qui aime participer à des discussions et des débats sur les enjeux environnementaux, notamment dans le cadre de divers concours d’art oratoire. Elle est une membre active du club de biologie de son école, qui prône la diversité environnementale, et du conseil des activités étudiantes. En outre, Meredith prévoit participer à la Simulation de l’ONU du sud de l’Ontario où elle représentera l’État du Tuvalu, un minuscule archipel du Pacifique, et où elle fera partie du comité de crise historique pour la guerre de Corée.

Jacqueline P.
Jacqueline P. est en 11e année au Warren Collegiate Institute à Warren, au Manitoba. En janvier 2007, elle a été choisie par son école pour se rendre au Global Youth Leadership Program à Washington, D.C. et à New York. Elle a participé aux discussions, aux débats et a traité des questions environnementales au Sommet des Nations Unies pour la jeunesse où elle représentait le Japon. Elle a aussi été désignée pour prendre part au sommet mondial qui se tiendra en juin à Beijing, en Chine. Jacqueline a à cœur d’éduquer et de mobiliser les écoles et les groupes communautaires locaux pour qu’ils luttent ensemble contre les changements climatiques.

Meeting with Alberta Environment Minister

Friday, April 5th, 2013

Katrina and I had an interesting meeting with the Environment Minister of Alberta, Rob Renner. He essentially believes that as people continue to consume, Alberta will continue to produce oil and gas. His solution to this problem is CCS (carbon capture and storage), which is not a sustainable solution and which has not been thoroughly researched. He did mention that Alberta is running 4 test plants using CCS to see how it works but you would need to spend 20 years studying this research to have a sense of its long-term impacts….and enen this time frame is not very long.

Katrina was ace! She spoke very well and asked excellent questions. The upside is that Katrina has been invited to a very swanky cocktail reception hosted by the City of Edmonton at the Grand Hyatt tonight at 6pm. I will of course accompany her to make sure she doesn’t get eaten by the big sharks!

Action speaks louder than words

Friday, April 5th, 2013

The greatest thing about being environmentally aware is being able to act on those principles. The Canadian Youth Delegation have spent the last week here in Bali getting around on bicycles from one conference venue to the other. Of course it’s hot and muggy, and we would prefer to be riding in an air conditioned taxi or shuttle bus, but we are using the bicycles to set an example of the types of actions we want people to engage in. Action speaks louder than words.

A long week…

Friday, April 5th, 2013

We had a representative from the Indonesian Youth Delegation attend the meeting with the executive secretary of the UNFCCC. It was a very informative meeting, although unconclusive. It was important to have a youth presence at this meeting and I’m so proud of all the youth around the world who are standing up to make a difference.

Overall, what an impressive, yet long week. I’ve never seen such stamina and determination in such a short amount of time by so many young people. Ahhhh, to be young again! Many of the youth attending this conference are here at their own expense and are working so incredibly hard to ensure that our government does something more constructive about reducing Canada’s emissions. The weekend will be just a slight slow down before the big-wigs arrive next week. This is where the real action will take place!

I’m looking forward to seeing how this COP really works. It’s very exciting being here…there’s a lot of action and a lot of media. Lets hope we’ll get even more media attention next week!

Meeting with the Executive Director of UNFCCC

Friday, April 5th, 2013

This is very exciting…we (and all other international youth delegations) have a meeting in 30 minutes with the President of the UNFCCC. A select group of people have been chosen to represent each region of the world. Keep locked into my blog to find out what happens…

Active in Bali

Friday, April 5th, 2013

Well it’s been 2 days so far and the canadian youth delegation are intensely active here at the UNFCCC. We met with the Canadian Delegation yesterday for a very interesting meeting. They agreed to meet us again, and to put forward a plan for constant dialogue in the coming year.

We spend our days planning and attending meetings. Every day there is a “daily action” in front of the conference centre where loads of media gather to find out what message we are relaying that day. This is an amazing group of young people who will most certainly make changes both here in Bali but also in the future.

I am really looking forward to the upcoming days where the CYD and other youth from around the world begin to make real changes. This is very exciting!!!

The Conference (Part 1)

Friday, April 5th, 2013

I’m taking a break from all of the action here today, and decided to fill it by writing my blog. I haven’t written since the opening day of the conference, and there’s a lot that I have to talk about.

Since the first post a sort of routine has started to emerge for myself and the other british council students. We get up fairly early and have a quick breakfast so we can get to the conference center in time for the daily youth meeting. It only takes about 40 minutes but after 8 the traffic becomes too thick for the taxi to get here in a decent time. After hearing the updates and discussing anything that affects the Youth Delegation as a whole, I break off from the rest of the british council as they stay for the Communication Working Group meeting. I normally head over to the BICC-stopping at Bali Collection to grab a bottle of gatorade or some fresh fruit-and get the day’s ECO and Daily Programme. After checking emails and reading through the Schedule and ECO it’s time for the daily action.

The actions are pretty cool, the Outreach Working Group produces a small demonstration everyday in front of the BICC. So far they’ve done things like give emergency swimming lessons, create climate emergency kits, and today there was a “carnival”. The carnival featured juggling and a climate change roulette, but the major attraction was the face painting. Youth called on delagate officials to paint their faces, as they are the people that are painting our futures. I was one of the youth who had their face painted, mine was done by an Indonesian delagate. In the end it turned out to be one of the best actions we have done.

Anyway, I’m starting to ramble and I have to go so I can get to a meeting on time. I’ll post the second half of this either tonight or tomorrow. I still can’t believe how amazing it is here.

John

First few days

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

I’m relaxing here at the hotel after after the first day of the UNFCCC and so far I am absolutely loving my time here. The first day in Bali I had some of the worst luck in my life in about a span of 8 hours yet because I was here I didn’t care and completely loved the experience. Everything that could have went wrong, went wrong. The airline lost my luggage, I lost a button on my shorts, the room arrangements were mixed up, etc. Basically it wasn’t my day, but on the bright side it was amazingly beautiful and the people and events were great.

On sunday, we went to a capacity building workshop in the morning and then dropped by the BICC to pick up our security passes. Later in the afternoon we enjoyed another day in the sun and shopped around on poppy lane.

The first day of the conference was both fun and overwhelming at the same time. It started with a little bit of confusion trying to find my niche in the youth delegation, but after a little bit of dancing and a lot of discussion with people who have been around a bit longer, I managed to settle down, join the meeting of my chosen work group and finish up in time for The Fossil of the Day Award ceremony.

John


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